Video – TD’ers at Bring Me Hope Summer Camp 2017

Hey TD!

Here’s that great video our Bring Me Hope team showed at TD on Friday (thanks Megan!). I’ve been singing this song all day today (ok, maybe not singing, since I don’t speak Chinese, but definitely humming!). Study the faces of the orphaned children and consider what their lives may be like.  Look at their joy, pride, … and dignity, and then please say a word of prayer for the millions of orphaned children they represent.  Then begin praying what future part you will have in His story in the lives of some of this world’s orphaned.

“Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world.” James 1:27

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TD’s Final Summer Meeting – Look Inside!

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Hey TD!

Wow, summer has swept by! Come join us for our final summer TD meeting! In addition to worshiping our God in song and having fun with each other, we have more:

  • Praise God! Most of our Bring Me Hope team is back from the Big Country after serving orphaned children at the Bring Me Hope summer camp! Come hear their stories, see their pics and videos, and catch their passion as they share with us what God is doing for orphaned children through BMH in the Big Country … and what He may be leading some of you to do in the future.
  • Aileen and Ashley have also returned from Taiwan after living at an orphanage for most of the summer.  They too will be sharing what God did in their lives and what He’s doing for orphaned children in Taiwan.
  • Last, but not least, Friday is our last time to hang out with Clara at TD before she defects … errr … moves on to serve at BASIC :), so make sure you come and sit next to her this week!

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Vlog #3/Video/Pics – TD’ers Bringing Hope to the Orphaned Overseas

Hey TD!

After quite an amazing first week of summer camp for orphaned children in the Big Country with special needs, three of our TD’ers have returned to us – Josh, Melody T., and Elissa – impacted and changed. They also got to visit one of Show Hope’s care centers (one of the ones we raised money for with V4V!).  Here are a couple of pics from the care center:

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Megan, Calvin, and Brianna still remain there, serving a second week; this time with more “typical” (no or less special needs) orphaned children.  It’s still been pretty challenging (as you can hear from the vlog), but also very rewarding:

Things have still been really good. The kids are having a really good time. Honestly, I’ve been encouraged by the kids this week. I didn’t have to take a caretaker’s role this week, but instead one of a friend. We’ve done so many things together: Basketball, football, soccer, ultimate frisbee, joking, a skit, cards, Chinese chess. They’re honestly like younger brothers. I’ve gotten to talk about faith with them a little and am hoping to encourage them in their walks with Him. They are probably believers along with most people in their orphanage. They actually did a prayer night two days ago and some shared testimonies. Anyways, apart from that, I’ve just been humbled more …” Calvin

Please keep them in your prayers as they finish off their weeks and return soon!

Vlog update – TD’ers Bringing Hope to the Orphaned Overseas

 

Hey TD!

Here are a couple of vlogs from our team in the Big Country, serving orphaned children with special needs with God’s love and care at a summer camp with Bring Me Hope.  It’s been quite the challenge for our team as they have been stretched in every way.  Our Father has provided, however, and they are doing well.

Here are a couple of updates:

“Things have been really busy, but time with the children has been really good. Some of us have been brought to the end of our patience and love, and it’s been good recognizing our need for ___. I’m sure it’s been illuminating for many of us. [One on our team] said that he actually appreciates what his parents do so much more because of this and we felt that it’s helped us appreciate the story so much more. Sometimes we strive and work endlessly to love these kids only to be pushed away, spit at, or yelled at. At that moment, it really lights up ___’s perspective as we continue to follow the kids although we are filled with sorrow. Man I really do thank ___ for how His unending love. Overall though, we recognize how we know so little about these kids and we’ve had to take in faith that as we change their diapers, dance with them, or swim with them, they recognize our love for them. They’re super cute and this week basically all of them have some form of disability.

With translators, I think we’ve all been building relationships with them as we’ve had to rely on each other to care for the kids.
We’re all safe. We’re all healthy, but we’re all super tired. Prayer for strength, patience, and ___’s love would all be appreciated. Please pray that we also find time to meet because we’ve been so caught up with our kids.”

“… I had a great time dancing with one of my kids. He really loves sticking to the legs of people. We rolled all over the floor because he cannot walk at the moment due to cerebral palsy. He’s been such a great example of tenacity. Apparently, last year, he used to be on a wheel chair but now he’s using a walker. He has the biggest smile and the best laugh of all the kids. He always jokes that he’s dying because of laughter. He loves being held and moved around and is very thoughtful at times. He loves to run super fast on his walker and he fills the room with a distinct loud screech. Sometimes he screams with joy. I’ll say more about him later. 

My other kid is a lot harder to work with. He whines a lot and loves taking others things. He often says bad things to others and really disrespects authority. Most of all, he REALLY desires sugar and balls. At first, I was really frustrated and really felt like crying when he told me to go away at one point. However, as I talked with translator, we realized that a lot of the behavior could just be a result of his upbringing. He’s quite weak and I wouldn’t be surprised if other kids stole his items often. Not to mention, he can be super thoughtful and caring at times. I was convicted by my lack of patience, love, and care.”

 

Please lift our team up to our Father in prayer as they break new ground towards fulfilling James 1:27:

“Religion that is pure and undefiled before God the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their affliction, and to keep oneself unstained from the world.”

TD Fri./Sat. – TD Missions Sharing and TD Tennis Tourney!

2007 TD Tennis Tournament (interviews at the end)

Hey TD!

We’ve got a great weekend of TD faith and fun coming up!

ON FRIDAY, we’ll be hearing from some of TD’s summer short-term missionaries to Arizona and Taiwan, as well as the ones that will be leaving next week to serve the orphaned in China!

ON SATURDAY EVENING, we will see the return of the TD Tennis Tournament!  We’ve had 5 tournaments in the past, but none since 2010.  Well, it’s back!

Check the video above for a fun 10 anniversary look at the 2007 TD Tennis Tournament!  You’ll see some TD alum that you now see serving at church in various capacities, including Pastor Garrett, Lynette (organist), Jon Ma (worship coordinator), Hubert (IFG leader), Jon “Duh” Lee (worship leader and admin), Tammy (YAF leader), amongst others (including Sandra, a 2x girls winner)!

Check out 2008 TD Tennis Tournament photos, with Robert, Kathy, Pastor Garrett, Sandra, Daniel, Randall, Nathaniel, Peggy, Angela, et al, all back in the day! Hit the drop down menu and click on the 2008 – Tennis Tournament.

You don’t have to be good at tennis to play, but you do need to RSVP to be included!  We will have playing opportunities for players of all levels!

We’ll meet at the Hsiehs’ home at 5:45 p.m. (eat dinner first) and get picked up at around 9:30 p.m.  RSVP with your small group leader  TODAY!

See you this weekend!

The Gospel in Asia

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Hey TD,

In light of TD’ers heading to love and serve orphaned children, typical children, and college students in China and Taiwan this summer in Jesus’ Name, I’d like for us to pray for these trips and get an overview of what God is doing in Asia.

I read the following article a few weeks ago in Tabletalk magazine and would like to share it with you.  Pray about it and ask the Lord what He wants you to do in response.  Your response can come in many forms, big and small.  But there should be some response of some sort, even if it’s to pray. – Arthur

The Gospel in Asia

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The advance of the gospel in Asia over the last century has been extraordinary. Christian churches are growing and thriving in countries such as Singapore, Malaysia, Taiwan, and of course South Korea, which boasts some of the largest churches in the entire world. Yet the gospel is also taking root in countries where we might not expect it to. For example, a movement of Reformed churches is growing in Indonesia, the largest Muslim country in the world. Moreover, the exponential growth of the house church movement in China is remarkable considering that the Communist government places strict restrictions on the activities of Christian churches. Clearly, the work of the gospel in Asia is something we rejoice over, continue to pray for, and look for opportunities to support.

PLANTING THE SEEDS

The roots of the modern evangelical movement are often traced back to the First and Second Great Awakenings in North America. These revivals have a mixed legacy, but we can be thankful for their emphasis on conversion and evangelism, which sparked a global missionary movement that ultimately marked the nineteenth century as the great century of Protestant mission work. Protestant missionaries traveled to Africa, South America, and Asia spreading the good news of salvation in Jesus Christ. While we cannot ignore or fully disentangle the Protestant mission movement from the often-brutal historical context of Western imperialism, which led to many European countries’ annexing territories around the world and the subjection of indigenous people groups, missionaries did plant the seeds of the gospel throughout the world—including Asia.

A good example of planting seeds was the missionary work of Robert Morrison, who was sent by the London Mission Society to China in 1807. He was one of the first to translate the Bible into Chinese and bring the gospel to southern China. James Hudson Taylor followed Morrison, arriving in China in 1853. Taylor founded the China Inland Mission, with a focus on reaching the interior of China, away from the more popular and lucrative port cities. Unique for his time, Taylor and his colleagues chose to dress and eat like the local Chinese as a way of identifying more closely with those to whom they were trying to minister. The work of Morrison and Taylor introduced the gospel to China, and their legacy lives on today.

Another example of gospel seeds being planted in Asia and bearing amazing fruit occurred in Korea, where the first Protestant missionaries arrived in the nineteenth century. Protestantism grew during the early twentieth century with the famous revival (1907–10) in the northern city of Pyongyang. As a result of the revival, Christianity was firmly established and would play a crucial role during the period of Japanese colonial rule. Christianity served as a point of resistance against Japanese occupation, and especially against the imposition of Shintoism. After Korea gained independence, Protestant Christianity continued to grow, and today South Korea’s population has the highest percentage of Christians in East Asia.

THE GOSPEL IN ASIA TODAY

Asia is a vast region, and each country has a distinct story about the gospel’s spread. No country is the same, but the Holy Spirit is working to bring the same gospel to each country. Here are three examples that will give us a glimpse into the work of the gospel in Asia today.

THE GOSPEL IN KOREA

After the Korean War, South Korea continued to see tremendous growth in churches and ministries. The fervency for evangelism and discipleship gripped Korean Christians, resulting in tremendous growth for the church in Korea. The numbers today are astounding. The largest church in the world is the Yoido Full Gospel Church, with more than three hundred thousand congregants. Yoido Church is a Pentecostal church, but many Korean Presbyterian churches have membership numbers in the tens of thousands. The Hapdong denomination which is a conservative Reformed Presbyterian denomination similar to the Presbyterian Church in America, has a membership of more than three million. In comparison, in 2015 the PCA reported a total membership of slightly more than 370,000. The largest Presbyterian church in the Hapdong denomination has a membership of more than 75,000.

The astounding growth of the church in South Korea has led to estimations that Christians make up nearly 29 percent of the population. This is one of the highest percentages of Christians in any country besides the United States. But the Korean church is not content to see the gospel impact only their country. Korean missionaries are now going out to the entire world in the same way their nineteenth-century Western predecessors did. Korea is often listed as the nation sending the second-highest number of missionaries, with the United States still sending the most missionaries of any country in the world.

THE GOSPEL IN CHINA

It is notoriously difficult to assess the growth and state of the church in China. In 1949, when the Communists defeated the Nationalists for control of the country, it is estimated that there were five hundred thousand Christians. With the Communist government’s restrictions on religion, many Christians gathered together in unregistered churches, avoiding public activities and gatherings that would draw scrutiny from officials. Yet all accounts point to the fact that the church in China, even under these hostile circumstances, grew and continues to grow. Chinese Christians are not deterred in their desire to spread the gospel even in the face of severe government opposition. Many scholars estimate that there are close to sixty million Christians in China. One scholar projects the growth to reach two hundred million by 2035. In comparison, there are 159 million Christians in the United States, and that number has been declining each year in recent decades. Consequently, China could eclipse the United States in total number of Christians in the next two decades. If the growth in China continues, Communist China will have one of the largest Christian populations in the entire world. The potential for the Chinese church is great. Not only is there an enormous opportunity for evangelism and church planting in China, but also for missionaries to be sent from China, especially to regions such as the Middle East where it may be more difficult for Westerners to gain entry.

THE GOSPEL IN INDONESIA

One last example is found in Indonesia. The country comprises a series of islands and is the largest Muslim country in the world. In the midst of this Islamic stronghold, the evangelist Stephen Tong started a growing Reformed evangelical church movement. Tong’s church in the capital city of Jakarta averages four thousand attendees each week. He has also founded a seminary and a Christian school, and he has planted multiple churches throughout Indonesia. Tong holds gospel rallies throughout Indonesia, where he preaches to thousands in stadiums and other open-air settings.

As his ministry has grown, Tong’s impact has extended beyond Indonesia to other Asian countries. He has established a regular preaching tour every week to Singapore; Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Hong Kong; and Taipei, Taiwan; in addition to his Sunday preaching in Jakarta. Recordings of many of his sermons and lectures have circulated throughout the Chinese-speaking communities, earning him the reputation as one of the most influential preachers in Asia. Tong is likewise committed to Reformed theology and has introduced many in Asia to this rich biblical tradition.

THE GOSPEL MOVING FORWARD

The gospel is moving forward in Asia in unprecedented ways. Borrowing the words of Jonathan Edwards, who ministered during the First Great Awakening, this too is the “surprising work of God.” The gospel seeds that were planted more than two centuries ago have produced great spiritual fruit. What can we as Christians in the West do to support this movement of the gospel? Let me close by making a few suggestions.

1. Pray for the work of the gospel in Asia. 
Many brothers and sisters are serving in countries where there are enormous challenges and significant dangers.

2. Participate by reaching out to and sharing the gospel with foreign students and workers in your community from Asia
In this age of globalization, there are many students and workers from Asia coming to the United States for short periods of time. As they hear and receive the gospel in America, they will return to their home countries with the good news of salvation in Jesus Christ.

3. Finally, if you have the opportunity, go and travel to Asia and see for yourself what the Lord is doing
Contact missionaries and churches and ask what their needs are and how you can go and help. I am certain it will be a life-changing experience.

© Tabletalk magazine

Dr. Jeffrey K. Jue is provost, executive vice president, and Stephen Tong Chair of Reformed Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. He is a teaching elder in the PCA.

How Do We Make Disciples of All Nations if We’re Not Gifted in Apologetics or Evangelism?

Hey TD!

Each year at our church we have a missions conference, encouraging and exhorting us to consider going overseas to be a missionary and to “do missions.”  This weekend was no different.  Some leave these weekends feeling challenged and called to make plans to do just that.  Others, on the other hand, feel a conflict within, like they are being slighted as Christians if they don’t go.  Some feel uncomfortable when a missionary comes to speak because they feel that they are made to feel guilty and less of a Christian than overseas missionaries are.

“Some feel uncomfortable when a missionary comes to speak because they feel that they are made to feel guilty and less of a Christian than overseas missionaries are.”

I want to remind you that it is your obedience to what you know God is asking of you that is the key to all of this.  It’s not about going overseas or not.  It’s about obeying Him, being who He wants you to be and doing what He wants you to do, doing it how He wants you to do it and where He wants you to do it.  And that is different for each person.  It’s not a matter of what geographical state you are in as much as it is a matter of what spiritual and mental state you are in – a state of wanting what you want and living for that, or a state of wanting what He wants and living for that.

“It’s not a matter of what geographical state you are in as much as it is a matter of what spiritual and mental state you are in …”

The truth is that Christ’s followers are missionaries everywhere, all the time.  For those who are Christ’s, heaven is your real home, and anywhere on planet earth is a foreign place to you – whether you’re in the SGV or in China.  And we need to live like that, doing missions everywhere, all the time.  If you are doing that, you are a certified, bona fide missionary.  It’s not the location of your body; rather, it’s the location of your heart.  But that heart will be willing to stay or go wherever the Lord wants.

And that’s what our friend, Greg Koukl (Stand to Reason), in today’s video above is focused on – figuring out a way to represent the Lord well wherever you are, even if apologetics or evangelism is not your particular gifting or bent.  I hope it is helpful to you.

Watch and then work with your small group leader to help you figure out how to obey the call. – Arthur