Kodi Lee – Blind with Autism on “America’s Got Talent” – it’s way more than just a great story …

Kodi’s performance on America’s Got Talent

Hey TD,

The abortion debate is in full swing and the United States Supreme Court upheld Indiana’s legislation that requires burial or cremation of a baby’s body following an abortion. Yet, it declined to consider the constitutionality of Indian’s law that bans abortion based on sex, race, or disability.

Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger advocated for the compulsory segregation or sterilization of the “unfit” as well as eliminating the “unfit” before they are born, so they would not become a burden on society.  What a slippery slope. Who gets to determine who is “unfit”? Who gets to define a “burden” and the criteria used to determine that? Who determines that one life is more valuable and meaningful than another? On what basis? Says who?

If God created us and actively gives and sustains the lives of every human being on the planet each and every moment, is stands to reason that He, the Author of Life itself, alone has the right to determine its worth.  What we find in the Bible is that God bestows inherent dignity and worth to EVERY human being, as each human – no matter how different he/she is than others – is valuable and bears His image.

Watching Kodi Lee’s amazing performance on America’s Got Talent illustrated that for me, as many would consider him “unfit” to live and a drain on society’s resources.  Others argue on the basis of “compassion” for those with disabilities, stating that eliminating them would be a compassionate act, putting them out of their misery and sparing them the indignity of being reminded every day they’re alive that they aren’t “normal.” Who would want to live that way? That’s cruelty, they argue.

In my experience with those with disabilities and their families, I have found exactly the opposite to be true for both the disabled and their families.  Many affected by disabilities are actually quite happy, and their families feel immensely blessed to have them in their families.

Watching Kodi and his family affirmed all of that for me.  We are not defined by our abilities or lack of them.  We are defined by the value God places on us and goes straight to who we are – God’s image bearers. – Arthur

 

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No TD Fri./Service Opportunities Sat.

Hey TD!

Just a reminder that we do not have TD this Friday.  Our next TD meeting will be next Friday, May 6.

However, there are two great service opportunities on Saturday:

  • Convalescent Home – from 10 a.m. – noon.  Meet at my home at 9:30 a.m.
  • Coaching kids with autism – from 4 p.m. – 5 p.m. (must register with me first). Meet at my home at 3:30 p.m.

Not only are these great ways for us Christians to reach into and serve our community, you can also satisfy your service hours requirement.

Hope to see you on Saturday! – Arthur

I Can Only Imagine …

I am wiping tears from my eyes right now.  I just watched a blind boy sing to Jesus, “I can only imagine what my eyes will see when Your face is before me …”  Those lyrics hit me in a new way this time around … and humbled me.  The blind boy, Christopher Duffley, also was born a “premie,” was given up to foster care, then was adopted by his aunt.    Christopher also happens to have autism.  This is an incredible piece of worship.

In preparation for Easter and in celebration of Autism Awareness Month, may you be inspired to fight through your own “spiritual autism,” get over yourself, and fight to know, honor, and worship Him with all you have. – Arthur

Dear “Daddy” in Seat 16C

shanell mouland

Hey TD! You know, opportunities abound on a daily basis for us to allow God’s goodness, kindness, and tender care for His creation to be communicated and tangibly felt through us.  We are to be channels of displaying Him.  He could display Himself any way He wants, but one of His primary avenues of displaying His perfection is through us broken and imperfect vessels – jars of clay as 2 Corinthians 4 terms it.

Jars of clay.  How fitting.  Jars are designed to hold and contain something of value that is to be used and poured out.  Clay is brittle and fragile and must be handled with care.  That about sums us up doesn’t, it?  As humbling as it may be to hear that we are merely receptacles to dispense God’s grace, and not the grace itself, it is a fact that we need to embrace.  We exist to display God, and when we do, it engenders a hope and faith that the world desperately needs to experience.

Here is an open letter that was posted from a mother to a man she doesn’t even know, thanking him for the way he treated her 3-year old daughter with autism on the airplane.  The letter found its way to him and they reconnected.  It’s moving.  I don’t know if the “Daddy” in seat 16C was a Christian, but God used him to show His tender love.  Let’s do the same! – Arthur

Dear “Daddy,”

I don’t know your name, but Kate called you “daddy” for the entire flight last week and you kindly never corrected her. In fact, you didn’t even flinch as you could probably tell that she was not confusing you with her own “daddy,” but instead making a judgment regarding your level of “safety” for her. If she calls you “daddy” then you better believe she thinks you are alright.

I sat Kate, my 3-year-old who has autism, in the middle seat knowing full well that there would be a stranger sitting next to her for the duration of this flight. I had to make a quick decision and based on her obsession with opening and closing the window shade, I figured she might be less of a distraction if she sat in the middle. I watched the entire Temple basketball team board the plane, and wondered if one of these giants might sit by Kate. They all moved toward the back. She would have liked that, she would have made some observations that I would have had to deal with, but she would have liked those players. I watched many Grandmotherly women board and hoped for one to take the seat but they walked on by. For a fleeting moment I thought we might have a free seat beside us, and then you walked up and sat down with your briefcase and your important documents and I had a vision of Kate pouring her water all over your multi-million dollar contracts, or house deeds, or whatever it was you held. The moment you sat down, Kate started to rub your arm. Your jacket was soft and she liked the feel of it.  You smiled at her and she said:  “Hi, Daddy, that’s my mom.” Then she had you.

You could have shifted uncomfortably in your seat. You could have ignored her. You could have given me that “smile” that I despise because it means; “manage your child please.” You did none of that. You engaged Kate in conversation and you asked her questions about her turtles. She could never really answer your questions but she was so enamored with you that she kept eye contact and joint attention on the items you were asking her about. I watched and smiled. I made a few polite offers to distract her, but you would have none of it.

Kate: (Upon noticing you had an iPad)  Is dis Daddy’s puduter?

You: This is my iPad. Would you like to see it?

Kate: To me?????? (I know she thought you were offering it to her to keep)

Me: Look with your eyes, Kate. That is not yours.

Kate: Dat’s nice!

You: (Upon noticing that Kate had an iPad)  I like your computer, too.  It has a nice purple case.

Kate: Daddy wanna be a bad guy? (She offered shredder to you and that, my friend, is high praise)

You: Cool.

The interaction went on and on and you never once seemed annoyed. She gave you some moments of peace while she played with her Anna and Elsa dolls. Kind of her to save you from playing Barbies, but I bet you wouldn’t have minded a bit.  I bet you have little girls, too.

Not long before we landed Kate had reached her limit. She screamed to have her seatbelt off, she screamed for me to open the plane door and she cried repeating, “Plane is cwosed (closed)” over and over. You tried to redirect her attention to her toys.  She was already too far gone at this point, but the fact that you tried to help your new little friend made me emotional.

In case you are wondering, she was fine the moment we stepped off the plane. Thank you for letting us go ahead of you. She was feeling overwhelmed and escaping the plane and a big, long hug was all she needed.

So, thank you. Thank you for not making me repeat those awful apologetic sentences that I so often say in public. Thank you for entertaining Kate so much that she had her most successful plane ride, yet. And, thank you for putting your papers away and playing turtles with our girl.

This post originally appeared on Go Team Kate.