TD Fri. – TD Family Night

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Hey TD!

This Friday is TD Family Night! Woohoo!

This evening is for both you TD’ers and your families. It will be a time for us to bring our families together for an evening of TD! We will have a great time getting to know each other, worshiping, learning about TD, and having fun together as a TD family.  It’ll be from 7:30 p.m. – 10 p.m.
We can only have TD Family Night if you families are present, so please make plans to have your families come and join us! Please RSVP with your small group leader.
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Christian Love Defined

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Hey TD!

I read this devotion from Tabletalk recently and thought I should pass it on to you. It’s based on a chapter of Scripture I memorized long ago and recite each week to this day. May it help you in your “love” life! – Arthur

John 15:12–13

“This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you. Greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends.”

 

In an age when love is frequently lauded but often misunderstood, we must have a proper view of love. Modern culture bombards us with messages telling us that love is a mere feeling, that we will never disapprove of those whom we truly love, and that everything done in the name of love is right. But the Scriptures instruct us otherwise. God’s Word makes it clear that true love is costly.

Jesus, in today’s passage, emphasizes the cost of love. Having told us to abide in His love (John 15:1–11), Jesus begins to unfold what abiding in His love looks like. Love means loving others as Jesus has loved us, particularly in laying down our lives for our friends (vv. 12–13). Our Savior obviously makes an allusion here to His atoning death on the cross that turns away the wrath of God (Rom. 3:21–26), and this means we must first consider what laying down our lives for our friends does not entail. After all, none of us is the spotless Lamb of God sent to save sinners, so none of us can lay down our lives in exactly the same manner as Jesus. Christian theologians have long recognized this truth. Augustine of Hippo, for example, comments on it at length in a sermon on today’s passage.

We cannot love others as Jesus has loved us in the sense of atoning for their sin; however, there are other ways in which we can imitate the love of Christ. For example, Christ loved us so much that He was willing to leave His place of glory with the Father in order to pay for our sins on the cross (Phil. 2:5–11). We, likewise, can refuse to exploit our privileges in order to meet the needs of others. Furthermore, Jesus spent His life in service to others, healing the sick and teaching God’s truth. Similarly, we can spend our lives in service to others, helping even those who seem the least deserving of our assistance and pointing people to Christ.

Some of us may literally have to die in order to save another person’s life, but that will be rare. More likely, we will lay down our lives in a multitude of smaller ways. Parents can set aside their right to rest quietly after a hard day of work in order to spend time with their children. Employers, when appropriate, can refrain from giving overly harsh but deserved criticism of employees in order to work alongside them and help them improve. Retirees can give up part of the spare time they labored years to earn in order to volunteer at their churches. Whatever our station in life, we should look for ways to spend our lives for the sake of others.

 

CORAM DEO Living before the face of God

Christian love is costly, and it looks for ways to give of itself to others. Every day, there are little ways we can sacrifice some of our rights and privileges in order to love others, especially those in the body of Christ. Let us look this day to give up something in order to do good to another person.


FOR FURTHER STUDY
  • Ruth 4
  • Song of Solomon 8:6
  • Mark 14:3–9
  • 1 John 3:16–18

TD Fri. – “A Deeper Dive into TD” (Pre-Party @ 7:15 p.m.)

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“Remember the days of old; consider the years of many generations; ask your father, and he will show you, your elders, and they will tell you.” Deuteronomy 32:7

Hey TD!

Last week, Daniel began taking us on a fun and enlightening journey through TD’s history, beginning with the Pre-TD Era and the TD Era.  This week, he’ll continue his tour by taking us through the Early Modern TD Era and landing at the current Modern TD Era.

We’ll then go from overview to underview as we go under the hood of TD and take a look at its infrastructure and the ministries that make TD go; ministries that you have an opportunity to participate in and shape in the upcoming year. We’ll hear from those heading up those ministry groups, as they share their vision and heart.

We’ll also hear from the team that went to serve orphans in China this summer through Bring Me Hope’s Summer Camp!

It’ll be a great time! See you Friday!

Pics/Video From TD Kick-Off ’18 – ’19

TD Kick-Off

Sandra awards the top 3 finishers in the “pssssssssss” game – Jason, Stella, and Anabell!

Hey TD!

Take a look at some photos, moving photos, and videos from last week’s TD Kick-Off, courtesy of Peter. Thanks Peter!

TD Kick-Off ’18-19 Pics/Video

See you at TD at 7:15 p.m.!

TD Fri. – A Bird’s Eye View of TD (7:15 p.m. pre-party)

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Hey TD!

Now that we’ve officially kicked off the new year, let’s get a bird’s eye view of TD, its place in the church, it’s place in your life, its potential impact in your personal community, and what lies ahead in the coming year. We’ll have a great time of worship, fun, and snacks, as well.

It all starts off at 7:15 p.m. with our TD Pre-Party! See you Friday!

Called to Live Lives “Out of This World”

Hey TD!

In August, Robert wrapped up our year-long series, “Renew: Transforming Our Life in Christ,” by teaching on Romans 12:16-21. It’s a very challenging message to live lives that are “out of this world” in relation to the rest of the world.

Below are his mp3 message, two moving videos he showed, and an article of uncommon faith.

“Out of This World” (mp3) Rom. 12:16-21 – Robert

Christianity Today Article – Forgiveness: Muslims Moved as Coptic Christians Do the Unimaginable

 

Why I Read Proverbs Everyday

Hey TD!
I read this article last month and started implementing this practice in my own life (though I have missed some days along the way 😦 ). It’s been a good, practical input in my day that has helped sharpen the everyday-street-level outlook to my day.
I encourage you to consider this practice for yourself. It will help you hear from God, not just on the theological level, but on the day-to-day level of living. – Arthur

Why I read Proverbs every day

I PLAN TO CONTINUE THIS PRACTICE FOR THE REST OF MY LIFE, FOR I NEVER OUTGROW THE NEED FOR THE PRACTICAL WISDOM OF THIS DIVINELY-INSPIRED BOOK.

Proverbs has always been one of my favorite books. When as a young man it was called to my attention that there’s a chapter for each of the thirty-one days in a month, I began the habit of daily reading the chapter of Proverbs that corresponds with the day of the month. After doing so now for over forty years, I was astonished to realize that means I’ve read through the book of Proverbs more than five hundred times. And I plan to continue the practice for the rest of my life, for I never outgrow the need for the practical wisdom of this divinely-inspired book.

But I must admit there are places in the Proverbs where I’m sometimes tempted to think, “Why do I need to read this again?” When I come to chapter seven, for example, I’m so familiar with the story that I know exactly what’s going to happen when the foolish young man decides to walk down the street where the adulteress lurks. I want to say to the guy, “Don’t go down there this month! You’ve gone down there every month for forty years and it always ends badly. For once could you take a different route?” But every month he heads down there, and he always ends up “going down to the chambers of death” (7:27).

WHY READ IT AGAIN AND AGAIN?

Since I know the passage by heart, why read it again? Then a few years ago I awakened to the reality that when the beginnings of such temptations inevitably come my way, I’m never more than thirty days away from a fresh warning of the ruin that comes from yielding to seduction. I don’t think I’ll ever reach the point where I don’t need that warning—frequently.

“Let anyone who thinks that he stands take heed lest he fall,” (1 Cor. 10:12).

Because of my love for the Proverbs and the perpetual value the wisdom of the book has been for my life, I wanted to instill its counsel early in the life of my daughter. So from the time she was very young, I began incorporating the book of Proverbs into our family worship routine.

A SIMPLE, EFFECTIVE EXERCISE

Here’s how I did it. In the beginning I would read a third of a chapter to her every night. During the first month of every quarter (that is, January, April, July, and October) I would read the first third of the chapter that corresponds with the day of the month. 

On the second month of each quarter I read the middle third of the chapter for the day. And on the last month of the quarter I read the last third of the chapter. So on January 1 I read Proverbs 1:1-11 (or thereabouts). On February I read Proverbs 1:12-22. And on March 1 I read Proverbs 1:23-33.

After a few years, I started reading half a chapter each night, alternating every other month. So on January 1 I read Proverbs 1:1-17 or so, and on February 1 I read Proverbs 1:18-33. Then when she was old enough, I began reading the entire chapter each evening, covering all of chapter one on the first of every month, all of chapter two on the second of each month, and so forth.

After these few minutes in the Proverbs, I would turn to wherever else we were reading in the Bible at that time.

Somewhere along the way I stumbled upon a practice that dramatically increased her listening and understanding. Before I started reading I said, “I want you to pick a verse to explain to me, and one for me to explain to you.” This made a huge difference. Often, of course, her explanation of a verse was off base or unclear. That gave me another occasion to make the Bible clearer to her. I commend this simple, but effective, exercise to you.

This article originally appeared at BiblicalSpirituality.org.

Don Whitney
Professor of Biblical Spirituality; Associate Dean of the School of Theology

Donald S. Whitney is professor of biblical spirituality and associate dean of the School of Theology at Southern Seminary. A longtime pastor and author of numerous books on the Christian life, he is also founder of The Center for Biblical Spirituality and is author of numerous books including Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life and Praying the Bible.

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