TD Fri. – “Do People Take You Seriously?”

Hey TD!

This Friday, we’ll be discussing, “Do People Take You Seriously?”  It will be a dialogical time of considering how people view our lives and our faith.  It will be an interesting and enlightening time, I’m sure.

Also, please be working on getting supplies for us to bring to the orphans (see previous post).  We’d like to receive as much of the supplies tomorrow as possible.  Thanks!

See you Friday! – Arthur

TD – Help With Supplies For Orphans

 

MiniMBHOHHey TD!

On Show Hope’s web site, there is a good, clear article entitled, “What Does The Bible Have to Say About Orphan Care?”  (click to check it out).  It lists 4 biblical mandates: defend, give, visit, and help.  These are areas TD will be growing in engaging in over time (but beginning immediately).  But there are immediate opportunities.

As you know, my family will be traveling with Show Hope to China, and will be visiting most of their care centers, including Maria’s Big House of Hope.  I would like to ask you TD’ers to continue to help with the giving portion of the mandate by getting some supplies for us to bring over.  But you’ll need to act quickly.  Thanks in advance! (also, please give your monthly sponsorship money to your small group intern!) – Arthur

“He who gives to the poor will never want, but he who shuts his eyes will have many curses.” — Proverbs 28:27

“Pure and undefiled religion in the sight of our God and Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their distress, and to keep oneself unstained by the world.” — James 1:27

Here’s what we need you to bring to TD this Friday:

1. Summer sandals for boys and girls – new or gently used – size 3 to size 9 (for 1-4 year olds)

2. Young children’s toothpaste that can be swallowed – “flouride-free toothpaste” (can use 50 or more of these tubes so great need)

3. Pigeon weaning bottle with spoon for cleft lip/palate babies (available on Amazon)

4. MiraLax Laxative Powders (name-brand or store brand – many babies have gastro issues so many bottles needed regularly)

5. Triple Antibiotic Cream and Antifungal Cream (athlete’s foot cream)

6. Johnson & Johnson Baby Lotion – pump bottles preferred if available

7. Socks for infants and preschool children – size 12 months to size 3T

8. Baby Bottles – 4 ounce only (have plenty of 8 ounce bottles)

For those of you with access to more medically related supplies, here’s more:

Nasogastric small size feeding tubes
Petroleum jelly
IV cath size 24 gauge
Medical tape of all sizes and types
Foley small size catheters
Diaper rash creams, ointments, and pastes
Powder oral replacement salts
Dipstick urinalysis canisters
Exlax® chocolate stimulant laxative chewable and Fletcher’s® liquid laxative for kids
Pediatric elbow immobilizers all sizes and various kinds
Straight urinary small size catheters
Pediatric colostomy bags
Enfamil cleft lip/palate nurser bottles made by Mead‐Johnson
Sippy cups
Pediatric spacers for HFA puffer medicine inhalation

A TD Father’s Day Podcast – From Atlanta

 

Greetings from Atlanta!

My son, Daniel, knows my heart.  He knows I love my family.  And he knows my mind is always thinking of how to edify those under my spiritual care.  So, for Father’s Day, he produced a 12 minute multi-generational podcast for me that kills 3 birds with one stone – 1) his introduction honors me (while leaving me laughing); 2) the message honors my father, K.C., who raised and led me to my Eternal Father; and 3) through this podcast, you will come to understand who I am and why I am the way I am better (you’ll learn a lot about me that you didn’t know); which will help us both, as I attempt to push you, challenge you, lead you, cheer for you, support you, teach you, provide for you, protect you, inspire you, equip you … to love, honor, cherish, and live for your Eternal Father in a fuller and more meaningful way.

So, click on the icon above and enjoy!  I hope it will be an encouragement to you. Thanks, Daniel! – Arthur

Last Friday TD Meeting of the Year

Hey TD!

Our year is coming to a close! This Friday is our last regular TD meeting.  Not only will Robert lead us in wrapping up our year’s theme (Reboot: Seeing God as God Again), but some of our seniors will also be sharing their testimonies!  So, make sure you come out and show your support!

In the meanwhile, work hard to finish memorizing Psalm 139 (NASB)!  Once again, here’s Sandra’s special recitation of it (with lots of footage of her dog, Joy):

The Risk of Seeing

Hey TD,

Isn’t it weird how we can look at something and just not really see it?  Looking and seeing are two very different things.  As you embark on your summers, we want to see what God wants us to see.  Let’s start the week off by putting ourselves in a position to see life more as He sees life.  This article by our friend, Jill Carattini, at RZIM is a good start.  Enjoy! – Arthur

The Risk of Seeing

Posted by Jill Carattini on June 13, 2016

In an essay titled “Meditation in a Toolshed,” C.S. Lewis describes a scene from within a darkened shed. The sun was brilliantly shining outside, yet from the inside only a small sunbeam could be seen through a crack at the top of the door. Everything was pitch-black except for the prominent beam of light, by which he could see flecks of dust floating about. Writes Lewis:

“I was seeing the beam, not seeing things by it. Then I moved, so that the beam fell on my eyes. Instantly the whole previous picture vanished. I saw no toolshed, and (above all) no beam. Instead I saw, framed in the irregular cranny at the top of the door, green leaves moving in the branches of a tree outside and beyond that, 90 odd million miles away, the sun. Looking along the beam, and looking at the beam are very different experiences.”(1)

 

shutterstock_146680073_opt

 

Each time I come to the gospel accounts of the woman with the alabaster jar, I notice something similar. “Do you see this woman?” Jesus asks, as if he is speaking as much to me the reader as he is to the guests around the table. With a jar of costly perfume, she had anointed the feet of Christ with fragrance and tears. She risked shame and endured criticism because she alone saw the one in front of them all. While the dinner crowd was sitting in the dark about Jesus, the woman was peering in the light of understanding. What she saw invoked tears of recognition, sacrifice, and love. Gazing along the beam and at the beam are quite different ways of seeing.

The late seventeenth century poet George Herbert once described prayer as “the soul in paraphrase, heart in pilgrimage.” At those words I picture the woman with her broken alabaster jar, wiping the dusty, fragrant feet of Christ with her hair. Pouring out the expensive nard, she seems to pour out her soul. Fittingly, Herbert concludes his grand description of prayer as “something understood.”

The woman with the alabaster jar not only saw the Christ when others did not, Christ saw her when others could not see past her powerless categories. “Do you see this woman?” Jesus asks while the others were questioning her actions, past and present. “I came into your house. You did not give me any water for my feet, but she wet my feet with her tears and wiped them with her hair. You did not give me a kiss, but this woman, from the time I entered, has not stopped kissing my feet. You did not put oil on my head, but she has poured perfume on my feet. Therefore, I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven—for she loved much.”(2) Her soul’s cry was heard; she herself was understood.

There are many ways of looking at Jesus: good man, prophet, historical character, provocative teacher, God in flesh, one who sees, one who hears, one who loves. At any point, we could easily walk away feeling like we have seen everything we need to see, when in fact we may have seen very little. The risk of looking again may well change everything.

Jill Carattini is managing editor of A Slice of Infinity at Ravi Zacharias International Ministries in Atlanta, Georgia.

(1) C.S. Lewis, God in the Dock (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1970), 212-215.
(2) Luke 7:44-47.

 

TD Tonight – “Life and Ministry in a Broken World”

Hey TD,

Just a reminder that tonight I will continue my sharing on “Life and Ministry in a Broken World” that I started last week, weaving in our final set of verses from Psalm 139:

Search me, O God, and know my heart;
Try me and know my anxious thoughts;
24 And see if there be any hurtful way in me,
And lead me in the everlasting way.

It will be a meaningful time of perspective, honest evaluation, and direction-setting.  Really hope to see you at TD tonight! – Arthur

Girl With Down Syndrome Posts Letter to Doctor Who Wanted Parents To Abort Her

Hey TD,

Are you anxious about the future? The fact is that we all are, to some degree.  How we live with those fears will in fact heavily influence that very future we fear.  As I read the article below, I couldn’t help but think of the paralyzing fear that parents can have when they are told that their unborn child will be born with special needs.

When Sandra was pregnant with our eldest, Nathaniel, our doctor recommended an amniocentesis to be taken.  This is a procedure where the doctor draws amniotic fluid from the mother’s amniotic sac for testing.  When we asked what they would be testing for and why she recommended it, the doctor said that they would be testing for Down Syndrome, so we could abort the baby if the results came out positive.  We said that we would be keeping the baby no matter what.  I asked if there were other health concerns for Sandra to take the amnio.  The doctor said no.  So we refused the procedure.

The article below also reminds me of when Sandra was pregnant with our fourth child.  At the time, we had three boys, so people at church would often ask whether it was a boy or a girl, and say something like, “You want a girl, right?”  I would reply that we didn’t know and that we’d be totally fine with whatever God gave us.  And then sensing where we were coming from, they would say something like, “Oh yes, yes, of course.  Well, as long as it’s healthy,” leaving us once again to try to gently disagree with them, though I knew they were well meaning.  So, my response would be, “We will take whatever God gives us, boy or girl, healthy or not.  It will be our child and we will him or her fully, regardless.”  That child turned out to be Angela, and as promised, we love her fully indeed!

Courtney Baker’s doctor recommended her to abort her daughter after her amniocentesis results came in.  And boy is she glad she didn’t!  Here is a powerful letter she and her daughter, Emmy, recently wrote to her doctor.  Please read and glean!

See you at TD this Friday! – Arthur

Girl With Down Syndrome Posts Letter to Doctor Who Wanted Parents To Abort Her

13346502_1301947523152763_1423332115310457847_n

“This is Emmy, mailing our letter to the prenatal specialist who didn’t want her to live. He repeatedly suggested we abort. He said her and our quality of life would be horrible.” Emmy’s mother Courtney Baker says, “He was so unbelievably wrong. I want to do something to advocate, but other than my letter to him, I don’t know what yet.”

Emmy was diagnosed prenatally with Down syndrome.

13393457_10209340069080142_180859760_n

Last month, Courtney wrote the doctor a letter- the very one Emmy mailed off to the specialist who suggested so many times she abort her daughter. And here is a copy of the letter.

“Dear Doctor,
A friend recently told me of when her prenatal specialist would see her child during her sonograms, he would comment, “He’s perfect.” Once her son was born with Down syndrome, she visited that same doctor. He looked at her little boy and said, “I told you. He’s perfect.”
Her story tore me apart. While I was so grateful for my friend’s experience, it filled me with such sorrow because of what I should have had. I wish you would have been that doctor.
I came to you during the most difficult time in my life. I was terrified, anxious and in complete despair. I didn’t know the truth yet about my baby, and that’s what I desperately needed from you. But instead of support and encouragement, you suggested we terminate our child. I told you her name, and you asked us again if we understood how low our quality of life would be with a child with Down syndrome. You suggested we reconsider our decision to continue the pregnancy.
From that first visit, we dreaded our appointments. The most difficult time in my life was made nearly unbearable because you never told me the truth.
My child was perfect.
I’m not angry. I’m not bitter. I’m really just sad. I’m sad the tiny beating hearts you see every day don’t fill you with a perpetual awe. I’m sad the intricate details and the miracle of those sweet little fingers and toes, lungs and eyes and ears don’t always give you pause. I’m sad you were so very wrong to say a baby with Down syndrome would decrease our quality of life. And I’m heartbroken you might have said that to a mommy even today. But I’m mostly sad you’ll never have the privilege of knowing my daughter, Emersyn.

13401471_10209340077920363_109859890_n
Because, you see, Emersyn has not only added to our quality of life, she’s touched the hearts of thousands. She’s given us a purpose and a joy that is impossible to express. She’s given us bigger smiles, more laughter and sweeter kisses than we’ve ever known. She’s opened our eyes to true beauty and pure love.
So my prayer is that no other mommy will have to go through what I did. My prayer is that you, too, will now see true beauty and pure love with every sonogram.

And my prayer is when you see that next baby with Down syndrome lovingly tucked in her mother’s womb, you will look at that mommy and see me then tell her the truth: “Your child is perfect.”

 

13407359_10209340074920288_651650718_n

Courtney told ParkerMyles.com,  “Emmy has two siblings. Rhyan is almost 15 and Evynn is 11. They are crazy about their sister!! They had been through so much at that point [when we received the diagnosis].

We tried to be honest with them while keeping strong in our faith, but they knew about our pain and struggles with the specialist. When they heard that her diagnosis was confirmed at her birth, they were afraid.

Emmy was taken from me immediately after birth because of low oxygen levels, so the girls met her when I did. It was such a surreal moment after all that time of fear and heartache. She was there and she was ours.


The girls both said that at soon as they met her they fell in love. And it was obvious. A lot of healing happened at that moment. We never looked back to the fear and sadness, it’s been onward in the smiles and joy. Rhyan is the calm, quiet, motherly refuge for Emmy. Evynn is the wild, fun, cracking up laughter for her. They are a perfect trio.”

Follow here

Kat Abianac

Kat is a writer and a passionate advocate for inclusion in the media and advertising. She has two children, one with Down syndrome. Use the ‘contact us’ tab on this site to request her media kit or to get in touch. You may republish content from http://www.parkermyles.com on your own site, provided a pingback is made to her original article and she is fully credited as author.